Non-Comedogenic Oils: Here’s a list!


If you haven’t figured it out yet, I will let you know that I can be an extremely opinionated bitch when it comes to skin care, makeup, and what I think. But it doesn’t hurt to do a little bit of research here and there to back a lot of my nonsense up. I have been researching different oils; their comedogenicity, in particular. Comedogenicity basically refers to a product / ingredient’s ability to produce comedones aka cause you to break out.

I have researched a variety of sources online, and some of the results have been rather contradictory. It is important to take into account that just because something is typically comedogenic, doesn’t necessarily mean it will break YOU out.

I wanted to organize the different oils and present them in as simple a way possible to show how likely or unlikely it is that they will break you out. And the sources I used for this include soapnuts.com, momandpopsoapshop.com, and acne.org.

  •   Sweet Almond Oil
  • Apricot Kernel Oil
  • Castor Oil
  • Evening Primrose Oil
  • Olive Oil
  • Jojoba Oil
  • Sunflower Oil
  • Safflower Oil
  • Emu Oil
  • Avocado Oil
  • Grapeseed Oil

  • Cottonseed Oil
  • Mink Oil
  • Corn Oil
  • Soybean Oil
  • Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil

  • Coconut Oil
  • Wheat Germ Oil

I was most surprised when I read (from several sources) that coconut oil falls higher on the scale of non-comedogenic to comedogenic. I haven’t used it on my face in quite some time, but I wonder if it was ever a culprit in causing me to break out. I still use it as my only body moisturizer, and rarely ever break out anywhere except my face, so I’d still recommend it as the best moisturizer for the body.

Did you know?

Based on what I’ve read, jojoba oil is considered to be virtually non-comedogenic, and is touted by many experts and professionals as the best oil for anyone who is acne-prone. I don’t find it is hydrating enough for my dry skin (especially since beginning the Acne.Org regimen with benzoyl peroxide), though I have been using a mix of sweet almond, jojoba, and castor oil, and I find this works better to keep my skin hydrated.

Finding out what works for you is largely a trial-and-error process, but it pays off in the long run. Stick to the oils that have a low-clogging probability, and do your best to incorporate one new oil at a time so you can see if you notice the effects (positive or negative) each oil has on your skin.

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2 responses

  1. I head that there is no regulation by the FDA of the label comedogenic/non-comedogenic, so is there anyway to REALLY know if products and/or ingredients are comedogenic or not? I also read that unrefined, high-quality, cold-pressed coconut is not comedogenic at all. Apparently, the highly refined, often hydrogenated coconut oils more widely available are actually the ones that are highly comedogenic…is this true?

    • Hi Molly! I’m no expert, but it seems to be that whether a product is comedogenic or not, tends to be a very individual experience. If It doesn’t make you breakout, then it isn’t comedogenic for you. Different oils work differently for other people. I use organic virgin cold-pressed coconut oil as a body moisturizer, and it works better than any other product I’ve tried. I won’t use it on my face anymore, though, because last summer I developed moderate acne (which as since completely cleared up). Hydrogenated oils, according to my knowledge, are known for being much more acne-causing, and I’d never put any of them on my face or body. Hope this helps 🙂

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